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3-24-09 Omodaka – Kokiriko Bushi

Posted by Sean on March 24, 2009

Folk songs in funny languages? (Max Payne-esque bullet time) NNNNNNNNNNNNNOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO…

Actually, that works out, cos I was planning on posting Omodaka for the next couple of days, and that’s what they do: folk songs that’re in this, like, language, instead of good old-fashioned American, which is of course what Jesus spoke when he delivered the Sermon on the Mount [1].

Today’s Omodaka offering is Kokiriko Bushi (from the Japanese bushi, meaning “bushi”, and kokiriko, meaning “with a high degree of kokiriko-ness”). Here’s what Asian Offbeat has to say about this song:

Omodaka’s 21st-century disco version of Kokiriko Bushi — an ancient folk song that Gokayama villagers used to perform for the local Shinto deities — combines synthesized vocals with a Stevie Wonder-ish bassline and ’80s video game chiptune sounds, and the wonderfully quirky and surreal video (animated by Teppei Maki) features a fragile skeleton dancer that shares the floor with lots of disembodied hands and floating eyeball-headed ladies.

After being all but forgotten, Kokiriko Bushi was revived in the mid-20th century and has become one of Japan’s most well-known folk songs.

I don’t have much to add to that, except that Omodaka’s take on Asadoya Yunta is about as far removed as you can get from their take on Kokiriko Bushi . One is weird, a little creepy and otherworldly, and the other, well, isn’t.

Directed by Teppei Maki. Courtesy, once again, of Far East Recording.

[1] I refer specifically to John 3:18-21 DJI +4.67: “And blessed are those who have 50-caliber sniper rifles, for they shall smite the Satanic  jackbooted thugs of the Zionist Occupational Government in their black helicopters with great wrath. You know, like in that one Left Behind book.”

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One Response to “3-24-09 Omodaka – Kokiriko Bushi”

  1. […] 3-24-09 Omodaka – Kokiriko Bushi […]

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